Can I use hiragana and katakana in the same word and sentence?

Q: Can I use hiragana and katakana in the same word and sentence? – questionier

Same sentence, yes. Most sentences use a mix.

Same word, no. Most words are set at one or the other, or sometimes you can change say a kanji word to katakana for emphasis, but you can’t mix katakana and hiragana in the same word.

Except for …..  well there is one word you can do it with, and you might of heard of it.  Any ideas what it is?  Answers in the comments please!

26 Responses to “Can I use hiragana and katakana in the same word and sentence?”

  1. Mark says:

    Ha, I bet there is more than one word. A simple example is the (slang) word スタバる (sutabaru) which means, well.. to go to Starbucks. Here the shops name is written in katakana (スタバ) and a hiragana suffix (る) is added to make it a proper verb. Beware that this word is mostly used by girls 😉

  2. Richard says:

    Naaa, I’m not giving you that Mark!

    BTW everyone, Mark is the author of the very excellent “Japanese” dictionary app for the iphone, well worth checking out, it’s what I use myself now!
    http://japaneseapp.com/

  3. Dave says:

    Is the word “karaoke”? From memory, the “kara” is written in Kanji/Hiragana and the “oke” is in Katakana?

  4. sugai says:

    けしゴム

  5. Zadiiii says:

    イケてる!!

  6. Sergey says:

    I saw this word in one text: けしゴム

  7. Katie says:

    サボる is one of them!

  8. Shane says:

    サボる (from french sabotage) is spelled in a mixed way pretty often. Another one I can think of (but only seen once or twice) is バケる but I think most people spell in in hiragana or use 化ける.

  9. Kiyomi says:

    It’s ra-men(ya san)hiragana or kanji for for ya and san is definitely in hiragana. Some the other shops like pizza ya san can be mixed with katakana and hiragana.
    Cheers,
    Kiyomi

  10. Anon says:

    消しゴム – けしゴム

    Eraser

  11. Moritz says:

    Hi, i’m Moritz from Germany.
    In my japanese-class i learned the word
    けしゴム (spoken: keshi gomu). It means rubber in english. The first part in Hiragana (けし) means something like “to erase”; i think it can also be written as the kanji 消. The second part in katakana (ゴム) comes from the english word “gum”.

  12. Meredith says:

    I know of one word that uses both katakana and kanji!! ヴィジュアル系 (^∇^)
    But I don’t think that one counts…..
    Some other instances I can think of are languages. スペイン語, ドイツ語, フランス語 just to name a few :)

  13. Meredith says:

    I know of one word that uses both katakana and kanji!! ヴィジュアル系 (vijuaru kei) or Visual Kei(^∇^)
    But I don’t think that one counts…..
    Some other instances I can think of are languages. スペイン語, ドイツ語, フランス語 (supeingo, Spanish; doitsugo, German; and furansugo, French) just to name a few :)

  14. Ciaran says:

    I bet it is Karaoke, considering that the oke part of the word was derived from English word orchestra and the Kara means empty. That is if I took the cryptic clue (you might have heard of it)

  15. アナ says:

    There’s a word that means ‘to go to Starbucks’?? 😮

  16. Leah Venville says:

    Is it けしゴム, An eraser?

  17. Mata Harati says:

    バスてい or バス停

    bus stop! I learned it as the katakana + hiragana but I think this is what the person was looking for?

  18. Neil says:

    Can I suggest 消しゴム as a fantastic word using a mix of all three?

  19. アナ says:

    Wait, what about languages, such as フランス語? That’s one word, right?

  20. Andrea Kurasho says:

    Hi Richard,
    I enjoy getting the emails and using your Genki Japan site with my students.
    I am sure there is more but けしゴム comes straight to mind.
    Andrea

  21. Andrea Kurasho says:

    Hi Richard,
    I enjoy getting the emails and using your Genki Japan site with my students.
    I am sure there is more but けしゴム comes straight to mind.
    Andrea

  22. Rebecca says:

    消しゴムでしょうか。

  23. Marina says:

    I know a word that uses both Kanji, Hiragana ánd Katakana! 消しゴム
    I have learned it in Livemocha, so it must be a right answer!

  24. Ana says:

    That’s a sweet app! Can you please make one for android phones?

  25. Tess says:

    I can think of a couple of words: toothbrush はブラシ(haburashi) and shopping bag レジぶくろ(rejibukuro). Do these count?

  26. Richard says:

    Wow, you guys have amazing imaginations, so I’m giving you all full marks.

    And next time I’ll be sure to define what “word” means :)

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